Are You Prepared
For an emergency?

In an emergency, the first few seconds can save a life, if you know some simple basic procedures.
We at Fortis are committed to sharing these best practices with you, so you too can help us save lives.

Place the heel of one hand over the center of the person's chest, between the nipples. Place your other hand on top of the first hand. Keep your elbows straight and position your shoulders directly above your hands. Use your upper body weight (not just your arms) as you push straight down on (compress) the chest at least 2 inches (approximately 5 centimeters) but not greater than 2.4 inches (approximately 6 centimeters). Push hard at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions a minute. After 30 compressions, give 2 mouth-to-mouth breaths.

• To reduce the pain, cool the burn – Place the affected area under cool running water for a good 10-15 minutes to make sure the pain reduces a bit or keep a clean wet towel.

• Avoid touching blisters – Do not break blisters, let them break on their own. Clean the wound gently and apply an antibiotic ointment, then cover the area with a gauze bandage.

• When you faint or feel dizzy, do not pressurise yourself to walk, always take the support of something or someone. Find a clean place and lie down or sit down. Stand or walk when you feel comfortable to do so.

• While sitting down, place your head between your knees. Drink a few sips of water and find a spot where there is enough air.

• To ensure the cut or scrape doesn’t get infected, wash your hands thoroughly.

• Cuts and scrapes are always accompanied with some bleeding. Usually, the bleeding stops on its own, but if it doesn’t, use a clean cloth or bandage to gently apply some pressure and stop the bleeding.

• Ensure you clean the wound with water. To stop bleeding and avoid infections, keep the wound under running water for a while. Clean the area around the wound with a mild soap and water, but make sure, the soap doesn’t touch the wound.

• To avoid infections and scarring, apply a thin layer of any antibiotic ointment. This helps heal the wound quickly and keeps it moist as well.

A stroke occurs when there's bleeding into your brain or when normal blood flow to your brain is blocked. Within minutes of being deprived of essential nutrients, brain cells start dying — a process that may continue over the next several hours.

Seek immediate medical assistance. A stroke is a true emergency. The sooner treatment is given, the more likely it is that damage can be minimized. Every moment counts.

In the event of a possible stroke, use FAST to help remember warning signs.

• Face. Does the face droop on one side while trying to smile?

• Arms. Is one arm lower when trying to raise both arms?

• Speech. Can a simple sentence be repeated? Is speech slurred or strange?

• Time. During a stroke every minute counts. If you observe any of these signs, call 105711 or your local emergency number immediately

Choking is extremely common, but can turn fatal in some cases. The Red Cross suggests a ‘five-and-five’ approach to perform first aid on someone who is choking:

First aid for conscious victim:
To perform abdominal thrusts (Heimlich maneuver) on someone else:

• Stand behind the person. Wrap your arms around the waist. Tip the person forward slightly.

• Make a fist with one hand. Position it slightly above the person's navel.

• Grasp the fist with the other hand. Press hard into the abdomen with a quick, upward thrust — as if trying to lift the person up.

• Perform a total of 5 abdominal thrusts, if needed. If the blockage still isn't dislodged, repeat the five-and-five cycle

For unconscious victim, perform CPR – follow the CPR protocol

• Consult a doctor when you are unaware of how deep or serious the wound.

• Excessive bleeding can be stopped by putting pressure on the area and covering it with a bandage or clean cloth.

• Swelling, redness, pain or oozing indicates an infection. These need to be treated immediately.

• Consult your doctor to prevent rabies when bitten by a cat or dog. Ensure the animal has been vaccinated recently. When a bite is caused by a wild animal, always approach a doctor for advice.

• Bats are known for carrying rabies and a number of people have been infected by it without any apparent signs of a bite.

• To reduce the pain, cool the burn – Place the affected area under cool running water for a good 10-15 minutes to make sure the pain reduces a bit or keep a clean wet towel.

• Avoid touching blisters – Do not break blisters, let them break on their own. Clean the wound gently and apply an antibiotic ointment, then cover the area with a gauze bandage.

Videos